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Erik Dalton Blog

Crick in the Neck

Crick in the Neck: From Pathology to Pain

A “crick in the neck” is a common complaint among clients seeking manual therapy. This informal umbrella term can refer to symptoms that range from general cervical stiffness to complete immobility and unrelenting pain. When assessing cricks…

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Adductors, Pudendal Nerve and Pelvic Floor Pain

Pelvic floor muscles such as levator ani, coccygeus and obturator internus attach to the front, back and sides of the pelvis and sacrum and form the bottom of the core. These muscles must be able to contract to maintain continence, and to relax allowing for urination and bowel movements, and in women, sexual intercourse.

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How Do Ligaments Cause Sciatica?

https://vimeo.com/208528897 From Treating Trapped Nerves Home Study The primary role of the iliolumbar ligaments is to prevent excessive lumbar sidebending, but these ligaments can contribute

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Bodywork, Hormones & Homeostasis

Recent studies highlight the efficacy of Pain Neuroscience Education (PNE) in understanding and managing pain. But can PNE and manual therapy coexist? Dive deep into the positive impacts of touch therapy on our hormonal system and the innate bond that starts between a mother and child. Discover how touch can be a powerful tool in regulating our body’s homeostasis and how it can influence our hormones for better health and well-being.

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Addressing SI Joint Syndrome

In the early 20th century, sacroiliac joint syndrome (SIJ) was the most common medical diagnosis for low back pain, which resulted in that period being labeled the “Era of the SI Joint.” Any pain emanating from the low back, buttock or adjacent leg usually was branded and treated as SIJ.

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I’m blaming it on the AC joint!

The AC joint sits on the point of the shoulder lateral to the sternoclavicular (SC) and proximal to the glenohumeral (GH) joint. Regrettably, this oft-overlooked bony articulation receives little respect from most manual therapists. Both the AC and SC joints play vital roles in the biomechanics of throwing and other upper-limb activities.

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