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Erik Dalton Blog

Don’t Blame the Rotator Cuff

The term Arthro (joint) Kinetic (motion) Reflex was coined by University of Pittsburg researchers to describe how sensory input from joint movement reflexively activates or inhibits muscles – and no other place in the body is this concept more applicable than in the joints and connective tissues of the shoulder girdle.

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Addressing SI Joint Syndrome

In the early 20th century, sacroiliac joint syndrome (SIJ) was the most common medical diagnosis for low back pain, which resulted in that period being labeled the “Era of the SI Joint.” Any pain emanating from the low back, buttock or adjacent leg usually was branded and treated as SIJ.

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I’m blaming it on the AC joint!

The AC joint sits on the point of the shoulder lateral to the sternoclavicular (SC) and proximal to the glenohumeral (GH) joint. Regrettably, this oft-overlooked bony articulation receives little respect from most manual therapists. Both the AC and SC joints play vital roles in the biomechanics of throwing and other upper-limb activities.

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Figure 1

Hamstring Massage and Mobilization

In a study of one NFL team from 1998-2007, the occurrence of hamstring pulls accounted for 85 injuries, second only to knee sprains, which came in first at 120 injuries1. Hamstring injuries often plague competitive and weekend warrior athletes for years, giving the illusion that the initial injury never healed…

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Anterior Scalene Technique

The three scalene groups derive their name from the Greek word skalenos meaning “uneven.” Although anatomists depict the scalenes as individual muscles, most touch therapists are aware of how they work together as a functional unit during neck sidebending and rotation

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Freeing the Ribs

Treating Kinetic Chain Kinks Recent manual and movement therapy blogs tout the importance of thoracic spine (t-spine) mobility as if it were a new discovery.

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Fig. 2 – Suboccipital Triangle

Suboccipital Triangle & Headaches

The second cervical vertebra, the axis, is considered the most important of all the neck’s bony structures partly due to its unique dural membrane attachment and also because of the powerful myofascial structures…

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